The shared stupidity of culling sharks and cutting penises

Banning circumcision would make more sense than culling sharksAlthough I haven’t lived in Western Australia for a number of years, I still have friends and family who live in the South-West of the state, and are part of the beach and surfing culture of the area. Therefore I get frequent updates on the recently introduced shark culling strategy from people close to the issue. With the news coming through yesterday that the first shark has been caught and killed off the Dunsborough coast, I thought it was time to reflect on the similarities between this, and the issue of non-therapeutic male infant circumcision.

Both are about money

The Government assumes that if it can be shown to be doing something it will bring back the tourists and recreational divers with their much needed money, with the bonus of additional jobs created by the setting and 24 hour monitoring of baited drums. There is no money to be made, and no economic stimulus just leaving the sharks alone, just as there is no money to be made in not cutting penises.

Both are based on psuedo science

Scientists, 100 of them in all, have objected to the cull in an open letter to the Western Australian Government, similar to the way that international group of 38 physicians from 16 European countries denounced the American Acadamy of Pediatrics’ revised policy statement on male circumcision.

Both are based on fear and misunderstanding

Many of us have a fear of sharks, possibly made worse by certain feature films and media reports of the occasional attack. We also naturally fear the unknown, and there is much that we do not know about theses sharks. It is a shame that the resources have not been put into studying these creatures, so that we might learn more about their movements, feeding patterns, and ultimately gain an understanding of why they might attach humans. Just as many Australians have lived their whole lives without owning or experiencing a foreskin, then hear the myths perpetuated by some individuals, resulting in them fearing it so much that they must slice it away from their own children. If they only took the time to understand the 16+ functions of the foreskin they may think twice before doing so.

Neither have real-world examples to support them

Before deciding to undertake such drastic measures, you would think that there would be an example from somewhere around the world to show that shark culling is effective. The only previous shark culling program I could find was from Hawaii in the 1960′s and 1790′s, which resulted in no measurable reduction in the number of shark attacks. Similar to how real-world experience shows that there are no health benefits to routinely circumcising males. For example, the USA has one of the highest infant circumcision rates in the world, but also has a higher prevelance of HIV and STD infection than most European countries that do not circumcise their children.

Both don’t make sense on a cost/benefit analysis

The shark cull seems to be an awful lot of effort in an attempt to save one or two lives per year. Wouldn’t more lives be saved putting those resources into reducing drink driving, improving workplace safety, suicide prevention, pedestrian safety campaigns….the list could go on. Just as more lives could be saved by putting the health resources into just about any other real preventitive health initiative. As far as I know, no one has died in Australia from having a foreskin.

Both have less extreme and invasive alternatives

It is a sad reflection on our society that we often seem to be drawn to the most violent ‘solution’ to problems. The number one solution to reducing shark attacks, for those who are concerned about their own safety, is to simply stay out of the water. Just as abstinence or careful selection of sexual partners is the solution for those men who are intact and worried that this status may put them at higher risk of STDs (which, by the way, is a myth.) For those who do still want to enter the water, there are devices that can be worn to deter sharks, just as those who wish to engage in more promiscuous activity can wear a condom.

Both are futile attempts to prevent things that are extremely rare

Even if the culling of sharks was sucessfull in completely eliminating shark deaths, it would only be saving one or two lives per year. In the same way that pro-circumcision advocates claim that circumcision can reduce the risk of penile cancer. Even if circumcision did reduce the risk, the disease in developed nations occurs in only 1 in 100,000 men and even then, mostly occurs in elderly men.

Proponents of both use semantics and euphemisms

WA Fisheries Minister Troy Buswell has stated that this is not a cull, but a ‘shark mitigation strategy’, which sounds much more scientific and less barbaric. Just as the pro-circumcision crowd fights hard to keep the euphemism ‘circumcision’ while many are now referring to the procedure as ‘male genital mutilation’.

 

One could find parallels between any debate that has fear and economics pitted against science and logic, and some may see this as an attempt to ride on the coat tails of another, seemingly unrelated cause. And they may be partially right. The goal of this post is to raise awareness of the stupidity of non-therapeutic infant circumcision with those who can see the same types of stupidity in culling sharks. But equally, I also hope that those who are against infant circumcision might be introduced to the shark culling issue, raising awareness for both of these important causes.

Image courtesy of Luigi Diamanti / freedigitalphotos.net

Corona is not just a beer: The Australian guide to the penis

Corona is not only a beerHow well do you know your own penis? While there are plenty of articles in both women’s and men’s magazines that go into great detail on female genital anatomy, there is little said, apart from crude jokes and discussions about size, about our own bits. As our parts are mostly external, perhaps we think that because we can see it we know everything about it? Well there is often more to it than meets the eye. In the following we give a brief introduction to some of the individual parts of the penis, and explain them in a way that the Australian man can easily understand.

Corona

Corona is a Mexican beer, famous for its citrus aroma and flavour. Many Australian drinkers garnish their beer with a wedge of lemon or lime to highlight these flavours, although some say this is simply a marketing ploy. Garnishing your own corona in the same way is not recommended given that it is one of the most sensitive parts of your penis, and may result in intense stinging! The corona (or corona glandis/coronal ridge) is the rim or flange at the base of the glans (or ‘head’) of the penis. Stimulation is achieved by the action of the foreskin ‘rolling’ or ‘gliding’ over the corona.

Every time I see someone drinking a Corona beer I question if the marketing department at this company did much research before naming their beer. Although the brand has been around since the 1800s, and also means ‘crown’, so perhaps they can be forgiven.

Sulcus

Some Australian men might know the sulcus as a new toothbrush from Oral B but it is also part of your penis. Although this toothbrush has been designed for sensitive teeth and gums, remeber that, despite the poorly chosen name, it is for your teeth and not your actual sulcus. Ouch!

So what is the sulcus? To be fair to Proctor and Gambler, the term sulcus is not unique to the penis, and is defined as a deep, narrow furrow or groove, as in an organ or tissue. It is a term most commonly associated with the narrow fissures in the brain. The sulcus on your penis, or more correctly, the ‘coronal sulcus’ is the groove underneath your corona.

Bands

Something we go to see at a pub on saturday nights. You also have multiple bands on your penis. The most significant of these is the ridged band (or frenar/frenular) band which according to cirp.org is a “ring of deeply corrugated or ridged mucous membrane lining the tip of the prepuce which provides “important sexual reflexes and erogenous sensation”.

Smegma

This should not be mistaken for a brand of top-end kitchen appliances (that’s just smeg), or a made up swear word on the tv series Red Dwarf. According to circumstitions.com it is “A natural secretion of skin cells and oils that collects under the foreskin in both males and females” that has “lubricant, pheromonal (sexual attractant) and perhaps bacteriostatic (bacteria-killing) functions”. It can be a case of too much of a good thing so the occasional wash is in order.

Frenulum

If you don’t know what this is stick out your tongue in front of the mirror and look underneath it. The bit that attaches your tongue to the bottom of your mouth is the lingual frenulum. The frenulum on your penis looks similar, and is the ridge of skin under the glans, joining it to the foreskin. Some call this the male G spot, but different men report varying degrees of sensation.

Docking

This is what farmers sometimes do to sheep tails, right? If you are the slightest bit homophobic perhaps you should leave it at that and don’t read on, because this gets a bit graphic. When I was about ten, I wondered what homosexual men actually did with each other. I thought that they somehow managed to wrap or twist their penises together. When I learned a bit more I remembered thinking back about how naive I was as a ten year old. As it turns out, I wasn’t far off the mark. “Docking” is a sexual technique where one man will extend his foreskin beyond the end of his penis and continue to roll his foreskin onto his partner’s penis.

Foreskin

Many older Australian men may define this as ‘the bit that is cut off during circumcision’. Most younger guys who were left intact know what this is, and know that it is much more than the ‘useless flap of skin’ it was called in the past. In fact, it is not even skin, but a richly nerve-laden group of special structures including the frenulum, dartos and ridged band. For those who have had theirs taken away and read this with a heavy heart, reading about foreskin restoration below may lift your spirits.

Glans

Every Australian man would know what this part is, you just may not know the correct name for it! Most of us probably call this the ‘head’ or sometimes ‘helmet’.

Dartos

This may sound like a spanish version of the pub game usually played with a beer in the non-throwing hand, but it is actually a thin layer of muscle under the skin of the scrotum and penis, and is prominent around the tip of the foreskin. Here it forms a sphincter to close around the end of the glans. It is what causes ‘shrinkage’ in cold weather.

Corpus cavernosum

This may sound like something you missed during religous studies in primary school. Wasn’t this the cave where Jesus Christ was interred? While an internal part, you should still understand it considering it is important for erectile health. The corpus cavernosum is basically your erectile tissue. When aroused, your brain will send instructions to fill this erectile tissue with blood, resulting in an erection. There are exercises and products that can strengthen and grow the corpus cavernosum resulting in stronger and longer erections. While it seems that most women don’t care too much about penis size, if this is important to you these methods can actually work, where magic pills and potions will not.

Foreskin restoration

Australian men like to restore old things, especially houses, motorbikes, cars and tractors. What you may not know, even though it is now getting greater media exposure, is that you can also restore your foreskin. ‘Restoration’ may actually be a misnomer, as the process is more like ‘growing it back’. It involves putting tension on the foreskin remnant to induce a process called mitosis, where new skin cells are grown. This new skin eventually can cover the glans to look and feel similar to the real thing. However, it’s a little bit like taking a standard VH Valliant Charger and modifying the engine, front grill and sticking on some decals to make it look like an R/T.  It might look like the real deal from a distance but upon closer inspection and a test drive you can tell its not quite the same.

 

Image courtesy of khunaspix / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

New cure for baldness brings new meaning to the phrase ‘dickhead’

Using foreskins to cure baldness?Many Australian news sites today, including the Telegraph, Sydney Morning Herald and the Age reported that a new experiment could potentially stop baldness.

Researchers have successfully grafted skin with new hair folicles onto lab mice, by using tissue from harvested human infant foreskins.

Is this a case of robbing Peter to pay Paul? On an ethical level, it would hard to justify making a cosmetic alteration to a non-consenting infant to enable another cosmetic alteration to an adult. Especially when you consider that to the original owner, the foreskin has many functional qualities which would be sacrificed for a purely cosmetic alteration to someone else. Fine if this truly was medical waste, but it is commonly accepted that there is almost never a medical reason to circumcise an infant.

I find it odd that this ethical and moral minefield didn’t rate a mention from the traditional Australian media.

This would not be the first time that infant foreskins have been used for the vanity of adults. An Australian distributor for face cream SkinMedica has found out that many Australians are not going to accept the use of harvested human foreskins in its products, with blogs drawing attention to the issue and complaints submitted to the company’s website. Oprah Winfrey has also been met with protests over her endorsement of the face creams.

Many Australian men already think that those who are balding should just accept it, and that those who resort to medical procedures to cure their baldness should be called ‘dickheads’. (With Shane Warne receiving the lion’s share of this sentiment). Perhaps this sentiment was a little harsh, but I think that for anyone who puts infant foreskins on their heads, the label is justified.

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Australian websites jump on the penis dunking and penis beaker craze

Australian online news sites have recently been abuzz with reports on the previously unknown post-coital act of what has been coined ‘penis dunking’ with a newly defined object now named the ‘penis beaker’.

I think I’ve given enough information for those with even a limited imagination to understand the concept, even though it seems none of us actually do it.

But for those who need a little help to put the picture together, here is some text from the original post on a site called mumsnet:

“We have a dedicated post-sex clean-up area on the bedside table. A box of tissues, a small bin, and a beaker of clean water for temporary cleaning/dunking while the bathroom is occupied by me. Apparently our penis beaker is strange and not the done thing. Does everyone else just lay there in a sticky post coital glow until morning? Really?”

The answer to the question posed in the last sentence, judging from the comments on the post, appears to be ‘yes’. While there were different variations on cleaning up involving showering, bides or plain old wiping, no comments confirmed the same routine.

So this latest ‘craze’ is not is not for the act of ‘penis dunking’ or the ‘penis beaker’ itself, which has now been confirmed as being performed by only one man worldwide. Rather, the craze is in the reporting of it.

Firstly there was a news.com.au article on October 11 titled “Query about ‘penis dunking’ goes viral on UK website Mumsnet”. Then today the Sydney Morning Herald picked up the story with their article “Why we can’t help wondering about other people’s sex lives“.  Curiously, this article links through to the news.com.au article rather than the Mumsnet post, perhaps revealling where they got their inspiration for the piece. We recently saw a similar pattern of copying penis related articles when news.com.au reported on foreskin restoration, not long after a similar article on a UK online news site.

And yes, we are also guilty, and probably more so by reporting on the reporting of the penis dunking/beaker phenomenon. But we are simply fascinated that the unique routine of one man, when each of us probably have a unique penis related routine, could cause such a stir.

One serious question we wanted to explore though was whether there was any benefit to washing one’s penis after sex. The results of some quick research were surprising.

We found that a study, presented at a HIV conference in Sydney, has shown that washing the penis immediately after sex actually increases the risk of contracting HIV, at least among uncircumcised (intact) men. The study states “there ought to be a little time left for postcoital cuddling before you go and wash”. Sounds familiar? Perhaps written by a women with another agenda?

The only other guidance we could find suggested that washing your hands immediately after sex could reduce the risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases. We could find no further recommendations on washing genitalia.

So it seems that there is no compelling reason for the ‘penis dunking’ into the ‘penis beaker’. Even if there was evidence to suggest it reduced the risk of STD infection, apparently the partaker is in a monogomous relationship with his wife. So it appears that the act is done purely for personal preference, to which we say, good on him.

 

 

Foreskin restoration growing in popularity in Australia

Some of us were circumcised as babies, and we are absolutely fine with it. Some of us are uncircumcised (intact) and fine with it too. A small percentage of men who were left intact decide to have it done later in life – mostly for medical reasons but sometimes for cultural reasons. And that’s fine too.

But there are some men who were circumcised and are not happy about it. For this group, in the past it was a case of just having to accept it, or being told to ‘get over it’ when these concerns were expressed to others.

Now it seems that more and more Australian men are learning that there is actually something that can be done about it.  The news.com.au website today published an article called Meet the circumcised men who want to restore their foreskins. The article explains the basic concept of putting tension on the remnant foreskin to encourage the growth of new cells, to gradually grow the skin over the glans. While not re-growing some of the specialised structures and tissues, the result can closely resemble and function like a real foreskin.

While foreskin resotoration was well known in Roman times, the art was lost until it was rediscovered in the 1970′s. The proliferation of the internet in the 1990′s made it possible to share the knowledge and techniques more widely. However, I believe that today was the first time that the Australian mainstream media, albeit an online outlet, has dedicated an entire article to foreskin restoration.

Unfortunately it seems that no comments are being published, so I’ll make some corrections and highlight ommissions here.

Firstly, the article portrays foreskin restoration as a process that is so disruptive to normal life that it is almost impractical to do. Most restorers I have connected with have managed to easily fit the routine into their lives with only minor adjustments. In addition, the article omits to mention that their are other methods that are less invasive, especially the manual methods where the restorer needs to only use their hands to gently stretch the skin at various times throughout the day – usually at toilet breaks.

My next comment on the article is that the ‘top doctor’ the author spoke to at the Australian Medical Association appears to have no knowledge of the natural restoration process. His comments were in relation to surgical restoration techniques, which was not the topic of the article. Ironically, he warned that surgery would result in a scarred penis – much like the scars caused by the original circumcision surgery.

Finally, I found it odd that the article ends with links and phone numbers to mental health and depression services. Is the author suggesting that only men with mental health issues would worry about being circumcised and consider restoration? Is this an attempt to dismiss the real concerns of men?

In any case it is good to see the media finally taking the topic of foreskin restoration seriously, and exposing many more Australian men to the benefits of restoring.

Top eight tips for making your penis larger (or at least how to not make it any smaller)

We all know that penis size doesn’t matter but given the number of spam emails promising you a longer and thicker organ there is clearly a demand, or at least an interest in penile enhancement. While most of these claims are, sometimes literally, snake oil potions, are there any proven methods that can make your penis bigger? Well there are actually a couple of scientifically proven ways to do this. And given that the proven methods are so few, I thought I’d beef up this post with with some other strategies to at least make sure that what you were given does not get any smaller.

1. Don’t get yourself circumcised
While it may be too late for many Australian men, if you have been lucky enough to escape the knife up to this point you should make sure you continue to avoid the procedure. (If you are one of the unlucky ones don’t despair – check out number 2 below.)

The obvious effect that circumcision has is to physically reduce the size of the flacid penis. It is self evident that if you cut of part of your penis you will have, well, less penis. As comedian Will Anderson quipped on the television show Good News Week, in response to a proposed Californian bill to make circumcision illegal, “what man is going to look down and say gee, I think I want to make this smaller”.

While many Australian men think that this effect is only on flaccid penis size, there is evidence to suggest that there is also an effect on erect penis size. An Australian study has shown that a circumcised penis is on average 8mm smaller than an intact (uncircumcised) one. This is thought to be due to the restrictive skin on a circumcised penis ‘tethering’ the glans and inner parts of the shaft during an erection. In addition the erect girth also becomes smaller as you lose the double layer of skin just below the glans.

2. If you have been circumcised, restore
While medical evidence may be scant, there is strong anecdotal evidence that undergoing natural foreskin restoration can increase penis size. By natural foreskin restoration I am referring to the process of applying tension to the remnant foreskin over a long period of time to trigger a process called mitosis, whereby the skin cells multiply. The end result is that the remnant foreskin grows in length to have a similar look an function to a normal foreskin.

There are two reasons why this can also have an affect on penis size. The first is the reversal of the tethering effect (outlined in point 1 above). It stands to reason that if the tight foreskin caused by circumcision can make the penis shorter by tethering it to the body then loosening that skin will release it and allow it to grow to its full potential during an erection. Note though that this effect is often only experienced by men who were unfortunate enough to receive a very tight circumcision, and those who restore from a more generous base may not experience any increase in length.

The second is the theory that the frequent tension causes mitosis not only in the foreskin but also in the penile shaft.

Many many report increased length of around 1 inch as a result of foreskin restoration. My personal experience is that I started with an average penis length of 6 2/8 inches, and after almost completing the restoration process my length is still 6 2/8 inches. However, I did only first measure myself after 3 months into the restoration process.

3. Stop smoking
Did you really need another reason to stop smoking? Well apparently a study has shown that men who stopped smoking experienced an increase in size. Or more accurately their penis size reverted to the normal size it would have been if they had never started smoking.

4. Start jelqing
I must admit, this is one I have actually tried. It sounds like an attractive proposition: stroke your penis every day (umm..that’s what I do every day anyway) and it will grow. But the ‘stroking’ is more intense than my usual efforts. The idea is to force blood up from the base to the glans to cause minor damage to the vessels. I won’t describe it any more than than in case I get it wrong. Which would be likeley because it is such a complex process. From warm-up wraps to warm downs, stricts regimes of sets and reps with various levels of hardness, different grips, days on and rest days. I tried my own regime at each bathroom break and I decided that after three months that if I had even one millimeter or growth then I would continue. My total gains were 0mm.

5. Traction devices
While the skeptical general public usually laughs off the suggestion that any device could make your penis longer it seems that the medical and scientific community is now saying that these traction devices might actually work. Similar to foreskin restoration, the devices work by applying tension over a long period of time, which induces cell growth. Read more on one of the more popular traction devices here.

6. Penis pumps
While traction devices have some scientific backing, the efficacy of the penis pumping devices is less certain. While some studies have shown an increase others have shown no change. They work by creating a vaccum around the penis which causes an engorging of the penile blood vessels. Over time (and again, six months is usually required) the vessels can grow, resulting in an increase in length. Bathmate is one of the more popular brands.

7. Diet and exercise
If improving blood vessels can result in increased size, then perhaps diet and excercise can acheive the same thing? Sounds plausible to me but I am yet to find any solid evidence to suggest that diet and excercise can do anything other than improve the strength of your erection (which is not a bad thing anyway).

8. Lose weight
This is another one that falls under the category of getting your penis size back to what it naturally should be. As you gain weight around your pubic area (to get technical, the mons pubis), the growing area of fat can effectively ‘swallow’ the base of your penis. It’s pretty simple really – the more that gets buried in this layer of fat the less you have to show. If you needed further incentive to finally lose weight perhaps this is the reason to get you started!

Eight is an unconventional number for any ‘top’ list.  I had intended this to be a ‘top ten’ list but simple could not find enough methods with any sort of legitimacy to make the cut. If I have missed anything though please add them as a comment below.

Bonds: not very very comfy undies

One of my pet hates is false advertising. I once considered complaining to the ACCC about Woolworth’s ‘fresh food’ claim when I realised that green bananas and rock hard pears are technically fresh off the trees. But can’t they just leave them on the trees a little longer? When I am shopping how am I supposed to know if I’ll feel like a banana next week?

One legitimate claim I may have though is Bonds’ claim of ‘comfy undies’. They have been using this tag for years but I have never heard them acutally back up why they claim that their underwear is comfortable. Is this just ‘puffery’? (See, I did remember something from Law 101). What makes them so comfortable? They can parade Patrick Rafter around in their underwear as much as they like but I think that Australian men deserve some specifics.

So here are some specifics on why I think they are uncomfortable. Firstly, they are too tight around my testicles. Now I don’t have particularly large balls, but even for me the undies pull them up into my body. This can even be painful when sitting or lying in certain positions. Even worse is the fact that it is now commonly understood that this increases the tempeture which can have a negative affect on fertility.

Secondly, while being too tight around the testicles I find them too loose around the penis. Unfortunately I was a victim of forced circumcision as an infant, and as a result my glans (head), which should naturally be mostly an internal organ, is constantly exposed to annoying friction with underwear. If this part of the underwear is loose, my glans are allowed to move around too much causing a great deal of irritation.

So in my opinion, Bonds have it back to front – their men’s underwear is too tight down low and too loose up high.

I should admit that I actually wear bonds underwear. But here is what I need to do to actually make them comfortable. I buy them, and like a good cellar wine, I put them away for at least 3 years. In this time, the cotton seems to become more relaxed, and makes them just right around the scrotum. Unfortunately they also become looser around the penis. But as I can now cover my glans with my foreskin remnant following an almost complete foreskin restoration this is now less of an issue.

So as a repeat customer, i don’t think my complaint to the ACCC would stand up. I would like to understand if Bonds actually did any market research into what Australian men actually want from their underwear. Bonds – if you do decide to actually do some research please let me know and I’ll be happy to tell you more.

AMI oral strips and nasal sprays: do they actually work?

If you have been up past your bedtime you have probably been exposed to some television advertisements for Advanced Medical Institute’s (AMI)  nasal sprays and more recently, oral strips. In addition to the commercials, AMI has also been a prolific advertiser through billboards, both the stationary roadside variety and the mobile variety towed through the streets by motor scooters. AMI oral strips do they work?Most use themes such as ‘want longer lasting sex’ or ‘more sex’ and ‘oral strip to last longer making love’. While action has been taken against the company, claiming that the advertising is offensive, I’ve found them only slightly embarressing, especially when confronted with them while in the company of my mother. Many other Australian men may only be concerned with whether the oral strips and nasal spray technologies actually work.

The ubiquity of the advertising provides the first clue in determining the effectiveness of AMI’s products. If the products did work, would they need to advertise them so much? In this age news of a product that really does work can spread very quickly through social media. And in the case of a medical product, wouldn’t it be sold through recommendations from doctors? Or perhaps the intimate nature of the problem AMI is claiming to fix is one which customers are are not comfortable disclosing on social media.

Which leads me to the question of what problem does AMI claim to fix with these oral strips and nasal sprays? Remarkably AMI’s website claims that their oral strip product treats both premature ejaculation and erectile dysfunction, cleverly expanding their target market to include a broad age group of Australian men. Putting this through ‘common sense’ test, you would have to ask if it plausible that their active ingredient would successfully treat a man who suffers from premature ejaculation (possibly caused by too much excitement, responsiveness and sensitivity) as well as erectile dysfunction (possibly caused by a lack of responsiveness and sensitivity)? While acknowledging that there are multiple, varied and complex causes of both issues, it seems unlikely to me that the one product could improve conditions that are at the opposite ends of the spectrum of male sexual performance.

Another thing to note from their website is that there are no claims of ‘fixing’ or ‘curing’ either of these conditions, only the ‘treatment’ of the conditions – a more ambiguous term that I’m sure was carefully chosen to help protect them from ACCC scrutiny.

Another question to ask is whether they they trying to fix a problem that doesn’t actually exist. Medical history is filled with examples of the medical world creating a problem in the minds of patients and then selling the ‘remedy’. Is this just another example? While there is an argument that erectile dysfunction is largely a natural part of the natural aging process, it is understandable that many men may want some help to retain their youthful virility. So perhaps addressing this issue is validly meeting a pre-existing market, even though blood thinning drugs such as Viagra would seem to have an established track record. But with regards to premature ejaculation, why would finishing in a timely manner be bad from an evolutionary standpoint? Could it perhaps be an advantage by giving you the opportunity and energy to procreate more frequently, with more partners?

AMI’s advertising relies on making men feel inadequate, by showing the disappointment from female partners who are supposedly left unsatisfied from their partner finishing ‘too early’. From my experience, most women need manual stimulation to finish off anyway, so except in severe cases, lasting longer is not necessarily an advantage. I am yet to meet or or even hear of a woman who enjoys endless banging away.

I can’t find any evidence to suggest that AMI’s oral strip actually works in successfully treating any of the real or ‘created’ issues it claims to treat. In fairness to the company, I also haven’t found any evidence that it doesn’t work, apart from my own suspicions and looking at their products with a common sense perspetive. My personal conclusion is that the best approach it to satisfy your partner with what you have, using any mutually loving methods you can think of, rather than allowing a company such as AMI to artificially create insecurities in your own mind.

Image courtesy of Ambro at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Average Australian penis size: what is it, and does anybody care?

In this land where big things seem to be revered (eg. big pineapple, banana, prawn, ad infinitum), how do Australian men stack up when it comes to penis size? What is the average penis size for Aussie men, and how does this compare to other countries?

measuring penis size“Does anyone even care?” seems to be the most socially acceptable response to these questions. But although most Australian men and women will often say they don’t care, it doesn’t take much digging around to get the feeling that we do, to some extent.

Just looking at the number of pages, posts and discussions on the topic will give you some indication of what a hot topic this is. But don’t worry about attempting to read through them all because I’ve done that for you, and can give you the 10 second summary:

1. Most guys seem to be curious enough to get the tape measure out at one point.

2. It is almost always guys who ask the question.

3. Most brief responses from girls will say they don’t care.

4. Most detailed responses from girls will say anything from slightly under to slightly over average is just fine.

5. Guys confirm that they ‘whip it out’ and compare with their friends only as often as the girls have pillow fights with their friends dressed only in sexy underwear.

So now that we have established that it’s not really important, let’s have a look at the various studies that have been done on the penis size, both length and girth, of Australian men.

The most recent study was by Smith et al which found that the average erect length of the Australian man was 15.7cm with a circumference of 13.2cm. Ansell condoms provides further details on this studuy and also compares the results to other studies from around the world.

An earlier study by Richters et al in 1995 found the average penis length for Australian (specifically, Sydney) men was 16.0cm. Interestingly it found that the circumcised men in this study were on average 5% (0.8cm) shorter than the uncircumcised (or intact) men. The theory is that the lack of skin in circumcised men effectively tethers the penis to the body, restricting it from extending to its full potential. For circumcised men who are concerned about this, anecdotal evidence suggests that foreskin restoration can reverse this effect.

The final survey comes in the form of the world penis size map, which while disputed by some Australian sources, shows Australians with a penis size of just 13.31cm. Personally, I’d be happy to not question this at all and believe that I am actually well above the average of my fellow country-men, rather than just the average as suggested by other surveys.

Not that it matters to me. Because it’s not important, and nobody cares, right?

Image courtesy of Carlos Porto at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Drawing dicks on The Herald Sun – juvenile doodling gets serious

Most of us wouldn’t have made it through high school without being exposed to at least one hastily scribbled depiction of a penis and testicles, more commonly known as a ‘cock-n-balls’ drawing. In fact, I may have even

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Image courtesy of slender volume

been the artist (or perpetrator) behind one or two of these artworks. For those who don’t know what I’m referring to, see the image to the right.

This is a fairly simply one, with more detailed drawings perhaps showing some hair and the meatus, or in attempt to be more shocking, some drops to depict some sort of spurting. But that was usually where the detail ended.

The more creative amongst us would sometimes find newspaper or magazine and draw our dicks on celebrities or polititians. Now this particular form of the art has been taken to a whole new level.

Recently a friend shared an image from the facebook page Drawing Dicks on the Herald Sun. The first remarkable thing about this page is that it has over 224,000 likes. Not bad for a page started in September 2012. The second is the exquisite detail and creativity shown in the images of, well, as the page title suggests, dicks drawn on The Herald Sun newspaper.

For example, the recent Kevin Rudd leadership spill that wasn’t inspired a different kind of ‘spill’. kevin rudd leadership spill of a different kind

It’s not just Aussie polititians who get this treatment. Sports stars provide good opportunities for doodling, even from many years ago. Take this example from the Australian cricket team’s dressing room. Is this really what goes on in post match celebrations?

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It’s not all just juvenile fun. There is often the opportunity to make a political or social statement, and the John Howard/Tony Abbott gay marriage picture is probably the best example of this genre. Check it out at the facebook page, before this and other potentially offensive images are taken down.