Doubts cast on Aussie tradie’s story of being bitten on the penis by a spider for a second time

Spider penis fetish

A spider fetish, perhaps?

While the mainstream media and online news sites were lapping up the story back in April of a Sydney tradie who was supposedly bitten on the penis by a redback spider, many of us were skeptical.

And then, when he claimed it happened again in September, in “pretty much the same spot”, our ‘bull-dust meter’ went off the scale.

Let’s first go back to the first incident on 27 April this year, and scrutinize some of his claims – many of which were taken from the transcript from this interview with Kyle Sandilands and Jackie O from radio station KIIS 1065.

  1. He felt immediate, intense pain.
    This reaction is rare. When speaking to the Sydney Morning Herald on redback spider bites Julian White, Head of Women’s and Children’s hospital toxinology department says “The initial bite may only cause mild discomfort or irritation, and sometimes is not even noticed. Pain usually increases over an hour or two and may radiate up the limb.”
  2. He was advised by emergency call operators to apply pressure.
    While this makes for a funny story of ‘Jordan’ having to stay at the site with his hands down his pants, this is not the advice that paramedics and emergency call centre workers are trained to provide. In fact the commonly accepted advice is to NOT use the pressure immobilisation technique, but to apply an ice pack or cold compress.
  3. He called for an ambulance, and when it didn’t show after one hour he got a ride with his girlfriend.
    So where was the appointed first aid person on the building site? Why couldn’t they, or another worker on site have driven him to hospital? It is not usually a recommended course of action to go to hospital via ambulance for a redback spider bite, except when the bite victim is a child, pregnant woman or elderly person.

Despite the above, it is still plausible that someone could be bitten on the genitals, especially in an outdoor toilet, as this one was. In years gone by this was a more frequent occurrence with many toilets located outside.

But then, when he claimed it happened again, it wasn’t just the writers here at Aussie Penis who were suspicious.

A few theories were bandied around over at Reddit, with our favourites as follows:

User DratThePopulation wrote:

“Second time? This guy gets off on having dangerous insects on his junk. It’s a fetish, I guarantee it.” (Read the full thread here.)

But we think user bluepooner25 may have been onto something when they wrote:

“Dr. Drew used to get people calling in on his radio show Loveline with Dr Drew and every couple of months some person would call in and say they had a spider bite on there penis. Every single instance it turned out to be an STD. I’m suspicious of this guys story, especially because he says the bite occurred on the exact same spot.” (Read the full thread here.)

Even shock jock Kyle Sandilands had this idea in mind when he suggested, albeit jokingly, that Jarrod had fabricated the story in an attempt to hide an STD from his girlfriend. Jarrod’s response to this was drowned out by laughter and other comments.

While we may never know what really happened, the bigger question to come out  of this is why would someone go to the media to tell the world about this embarrassing situation…twice?

Australian penises needed for coffee table book

Ever wanted your fellow Australians to admire your penis while they sat down to relax on the couch? No, me neither. But if this is what you are looking for, and you also want to contribute a story or poem about your penis then head over to the 101 Penis Project and put your best foot….or penis…forward!

So far, 39 photographs have been taken by a Melbourne photographer for inclusion in the proposed coffee table book. It follows on as a sequel, of sorts, to the successful 101 Vagina project.

Let’s help him get to the required 101 volunteers, as we would love to see the book published, with the photographs and stories helping to, in the artist’s own words, “help break down any remaining shame, taboo or stigma surrounding penises”.

 

 

Australian hospitals, please stop covering up the forced cutting of our penises

Dear Australian hospitals,

Please respect the bodily integrity of our baby boys. Boys do not need to be surgically altered when they are born, and when this happens, please do not attempt to cover it up:

Sydney Children’s Hospital Foundation attempts to hide the truth on circumcision.

Dogs become new target for Central Coast wiener cutter

Woman with puppyWith circumcision rates for human babies dropping across Australia, one clinic on the New South Wales Central Coast is hoping to fill the void in their revenue by offering the service to pet owners.

“It’s embarrassing when we have friends over for a classy dinner, and there’s Bouncer rolling around on his back showing all that extra skin”, says Sharon – the clinic’s first dog circumcision customer.

“We are starting with dogs, but we can foresee a demand from owners of other animals. It’s only natural that circumcised pet owners would want their pets to look like themselves” say’s the clinic’s owner, Dr Nicholas.

Darren agrees. As a multiple trophy winner in ‘owners who look like their pets’ competitions, he has often felt a little sheepish accepting the awards, knowing that Bundy is actually quite different in one important area.

“I’d consider getting him done”, he says. “It’s not just so that I feel more confident in the competitions, but also because we’ve had a few awkward moments when he has walked in on me in the shower. I’ve never be able to find the right words to explain why we are different down there, so I figure it’s easier to just give him the chop.”

Dr Nicholas also highlights that there other benefits in addition to the purely cosmetic side of things, including a lower chance of getting the foreskin caught in leads, religious considerations and the ease of washing the pet.

While not commonly used in Australia, the clinic plans to import a ‘circumstraint‘ from the United States, to restrain the dogs during the procedure. For human babies, a strong nurse usually leans on the child, pinning his arms and splayed legs. But with a dog, there is the risk that it may bite the assisting nurse.

Dr Nicholas explains. “Just as when human babies scream and try to break free, we are expecting a similar reaction from the dogs. Most people think that this is a reaction to having the end of their penis cut off, but no, we understand this to be just a reaction to being held down…we think.”

Asked if he was worried if some might consider the procedure cruel and unethical, Dr Nicholas assured us that “everybody knows that puppies feel less pain that fully matured dogs, and it’s hard to argue that it’s unethical to do this to an animal when we do the same thing to thousands of human babies every year”.

“Besides, it’s the pet owner’s business and nobody else’s.”

Medical associations recommend traction devices for treatment of Peyronie’s disease

If you have noticed a bend or curve in your penis that has not always been present you may be suffering from Peyronie’s disease.

Bent road sign representing peyronie's diseaseCommon estimates on the prevalence of the condition range between 1% and 5% of men above the age of 50. Like with many other conditions relating to male genitals the true rate is unknown as many men are too embarrassed to seek help.

Peyronie’s is caused by fibrous lumps, technically known as plaques, that form internally on one side of the penis. Upon erection, this plaque stops the penis from extending to its full length on that side and therefore pulls the penis to that side. While the common result is a bend, the plaque can also cause other deformities such as bulging or depressions.

While medical experts debate the cause, anecdotal evidence suggests that it is most often caused by some sort of injury, with online Peyronie’s disease forums forums filled with stories of men developing the condition a few weeks after hearing an audible popping sound during a rough sexual experience. The theory is that the injury causes an auto-immune response from the body which creates the plaque at the site of the injury.

The Melbourne Bladder Clinic suggests that injecting repeatedly into the same site for erectile dysfunction treatment may also increase the risk in developing Peyronie’s.

While those with mild symptoms may be able to function normally, most with Peyronie’s will experience some adverse such as discomfort, pain and sexual dysfunction. Given that some research suggests that only 13% of men with the condition experienced a full recovery with no intervention, many men will put their embarrassment aside and seek some form of treatment.

Treatment options can be classified into three categories, being surgical, medicines (topical and oral) and stretching.

Surgical

Like for most surgery on our genitals, we at Aussie Penis believe that surgery should be the treatment of last resort. Among other side effects, the most alarming side effect from one of the surgical options called the the Nesbit’s procedure is shortening of the penis. And although we know we shouldn’t really care about penis size, I’m sure there are few of us who would want to make our penis shorter. Unless you are like Keith on this episode of Embarrassing Bodies, who opted for the penis-shortening Nesbit’s surgical procedure to treat his Peyronie’s, but had more than enough length to begin with.

Other surgical options are explored in this information sheet by Queensland urologist Dr Peter Campbell.

Topical and Oral Medicines

These are generally thought to be the least effective treatment. But given that they are the least invasive treatment and there is some evidence that they can at least improve, if not cure, the condition, some sufferers opt for this treatment. See this page for information on the effectiveness of topical and oral medicines.

Stretching

Stretching the penis over as period of time (usually at least months) has been shown to increase the length of the penis. Traction devices such as this one have been used by men for many years to successfully increase the length of their penis. Recently, the medical community has adopted this for the treatment of Peyronie’s disease.

The following is from Better Health Victoria, which was written in consultation with the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand:

Penile traction device – this has proved useful, along with medical therapy, to lengthen the penis and reduce the curve in the erect state. Studies have also shown that use of a penile traction device may increase penile width, suggesting a benefit in the management of Peyronie’s disease. It has also been used pre- and post-surgery to prevent penile shortening.

Men’s Health Melbourne have even started offering traction devices as part of their treatment services for Peyronie’s disease.

For those looking to buy a device online, the Peyronies Device is a traction system designed specifically for those with Peyronie’s disease, or any curvature or bend of the penis. Unlike the standard traction systems it includes a ‘noose straightening’ system to target the location of the bend. Read more here.

While some doctors and medical associations are open to recommending traction devices for the treatment of Peyronie’s disease, others are a little more hesitant, suggesting that most men do not have the dedication or patience to wear a device every day over the course of months, even though thousands of men have been able to do this with similar devices for the purposes of penis growth and foreskin restoration.

I know that if I am ever unlucky enough to ever suffer from the condition I would certainly be willing to try the traction device treatment before resorting to the more invasive surgical options.

And I won’t be too concerned I manage to grow some extra length as a side-effect.

 

Image courtesy of nuttakit at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Foregen makes good progress towards goal of foreskin regeneration

Since it was founded in 2010, I have been following the progress of Foregen, a not-for-profit organisation researching regenerative medicine to regrow the foreskin for circumcised men.

Initial reactions from the foreskin restoration communities were full of hope. But once the initial excitement wore off the mood evolved to skepticism, with many asking the tough questions around the science, the funding model, the official charitable status of the organisation and even the motivations behind the directors.

microscopeIn a move to quash some of the doubt, Foregen President Vincenzo Aiello took to YouTube in this video with respected intactivist and TLC Tugger vendor Ron Low, to talk through the vision for the organisation, assure supporters of the transparency of the finances and to call for donations. Ron was also announced as Treasurer for the organisation.

Now they have demonstrated real progress including securing labs, carrying out successful testing with animal tissue, securing a source of human tissue, registering as a tax-exempt charity in the US and announcing a much requested crowd sourcing campaign, many of the detractors have been silenced.

The recent announcement of some of the above news has also attracted the attention of the mainstream media for the first time, with stories being featured in the UK’s Mirror and then the Daily Mail. Other news providers and bloggers then followed suit, with this Mama Mia piece being the first major Australian site to run with the story, albeit with an insensitive tone.

While I’ve had quite a satisfactory sex life with my current circumcised status, I’ve been I’ve been keeping an eye of Foregen’s progress, and would not have ruled out taking up the regeneration option should it ever become available. However, there is small but significant detail highlighted in the Mirror that leaves me a little squeamish:

This involves finding donor foreskins from dead bodies, stripping them of the donor’s cells (decellularization) to leave behind a tissue scaffold, and then populating that scaffold with the patient’s own stem cells, taken from their penis.

Using the organs and other body parts from those selfless souls who wish to leave them for others is now widely accepted. But the idea of having part of the penis from someone else attached to me brings visions of some low grade horror/pornography crossover movie. Would I be able to block out thoughts of the previous owner during love making?  How would my partner feel, or should I not tell her? Would I be obligated to disclose this information?

I applaud the progress that Foregen has made in their short history, and hope that thousands of men will finally feel complete once the procedure is proven successful.

I’m just not sure at this stage if the procedure is going to be for me.

 

Image courtesy of Photokanok at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

How to officially measure your penis length, and why most men are doing it wrong

When I was about 17 years old I read an article in a Cosmopolitan magazine which outlined the average penis length and girth. At the next opportunity I grabbed a ruler, took the measurement and felt both relieved and even a little pleased with the result.

Measuring penis sizeBut years later I received a rude shock. According to another study on penis size, I hadn’t measured myself correctly, and as a result I may have overestimated my size.

I learnt that there is typically a large difference in length, depending on which side of your penis you take the measurement from. I naturally took the measurement from the underside, or ventral side, because I figured this is the side that, when erect, is most visible to a partner. It seems that many other men also make this same mistake.

The problem with measuring from this side is that it is difficult to know at what point to start the measurement from. It is possible to stretch the scrotal skin at the base of the penis further under the body because the penile shaft actually extends in this area further than what can be initially seen.

For this reason, almost all surveys and studies on penis length measure the penis from the upper or dorsal side. That is, the side that is closest to your abdomen when your penis is erect. The base, or starting point of the penile shaft is more defined here, and therefore it is more accurate and there is less temptation to cheat.

From this base point, the penis should then be measured to the tip of the glans (or ‘head’). If you are lucky enough to still have your foreskin and it extends beyond your glans when erect, you should retract your foreskin so that you can measure to the end of your glans.

So I went from thinking that I was two centimeters (or almost one inch) over the average penis size to realising that I was just on average. Nothing to be too disappointed about, but being well over average height means that I may be proportionately on the small side.

SizeGenetics


Image courtesy of imagerymajestic at FreeDigitalPhotos.net