Medical associations recommend traction devices for treatment of Peyronie’s disease

If you have noticed a bend or curve in your penis that has not always been present you may be suffering from Peyronie’s disease.

Bent road sign representing peyronie's diseaseCommon estimates on the prevalence of the condition range between 1% and 5% of men above the age of 50. Like with many other conditions relating to male genitals the true rate is unknown as many men are too embarrassed to seek help.

Peyronie’s is caused by fibrous lumps, technically known as plaques, that form internally on one side of the penis. Upon erection, this plaque stops the penis from extending to its full length on that side and therefore pulls the penis to that side. While the common result is a bend, the plaque can also cause other deformities such as bulging or depressions.

While medical experts debate the cause, anecdotal evidence suggests that it is most often caused by some sort of injury, with online Peyronie’s disease forums forums filled with stories of men developing the condition a few weeks after hearing an audible popping sound during a rough sexual experience. The theory is that the injury causes an auto-immune response from the body which creates the plaque at the site of the injury.

The Melbourne Bladder Clinic suggests that injecting repeatedly into the same site for erectile dysfunction treatment may also increase the risk in developing Peyronie’s.

While those with mild symptoms may be able to function normally, most with Peyronie’s will experience some adverse such as discomfort, pain and sexual dysfunction. Given that some research suggests that only 13% of men with the condition experienced a full recovery with no intervention, many men will put their embarrassment aside and seek some form of treatment.

Treatment options can be classified into three categories, being surgical, medicines (topical and oral) and stretching.

Surgical

Like for most surgery on our genitals, we at Aussie Penis believe that surgery should be the treatment of last resort. Among other side effects, the most alarming side effect from one of the surgical options called the the Nesbit’s procedure is shortening of the penis. And although we know we shouldn’t really care about penis size, I’m sure there are few of us who would want to make our penis shorter. Unless you are like Keith on this episode of Embarrassing Bodies, who opted for the penis-shortening Nesbit’s surgical procedure to treat his Peyronie’s, but had more than enough length to begin with.

Other surgical options are explored in this information sheet by Queensland urologist Dr Peter Campbell.

Topical and Oral Medicines

These are generally thought to be the least effective treatment. But given that they are the least invasive treatment and there is some evidence that they can at least improve, if not cure, the condition, some sufferers opt for this treatment. See this page for information on the effectiveness of topical and oral medicines.

Stretching

Stretching the penis over as period of time (usually at least months) has been shown to increase the length of the penis. Traction devices such as this one have been used by men for many years to successfully increase the length of their penis. Recently, the medical community has adopted this for the treatment of Peyronie’s disease.

The following is from Better Health Victoria, which was written in consultation with the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand:

Penile traction device – this has proved useful, along with medical therapy, to lengthen the penis and reduce the curve in the erect state. Studies have also shown that use of a penile traction device may increase penile width, suggesting a benefit in the management of Peyronie’s disease. It has also been used pre- and post-surgery to prevent penile shortening.

Men’s Health Melbourne have even started offering traction devices as part of their treatment services for Peyronie’s disease.

For those looking to buy a device online, the Peyronies Device is a traction system designed specifically for those with Peyronie’s disease, or any curvature or bend of the penis. Unlike the standard traction systems it includes a ‘noose straightening’ system to target the location of the bend. Read more here.

While some doctors and medical associations are open to recommending traction devices for the treatment of Peyronie’s disease, others are a little more hesitant, suggesting that most men do not have the dedication or patience to wear a device every day over the course of months, even though thousands of men have been able to do this with similar devices for the purposes of penis growth and foreskin restoration.

I know that if I am ever unlucky enough to ever suffer from the condition I would certainly be willing to try the traction device treatment before resorting to the more invasive surgical options.

And I won’t be too concerned I manage to grow some extra length as a side-effect.

 

Image courtesy of nuttakit at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Foregen makes good progress towards goal of foreskin regeneration

Since it was founded in 2010, I have been following the progress of Foregen, a not-for-profit organisation researching regenerative medicine to regrow the foreskin for circumcised men.

Initial reactions from the foreskin restoration communities were full of hope. But once the initial excitement wore off the mood evolved to skepticism, with many asking the tough questions around the science, the funding model, the official charitable status of the organisation and even the motivations behind the directors.

microscopeIn a move to quash some of the doubt, Foregen President Vincenzo Aiello took to YouTube in this video with respected intactivist and TLC Tugger vendor Ron Low, to talk through the vision for the organisation, assure supporters of the transparency of the finances and to call for donations. Ron was also announced as Treasurer for the organisation.

Now they have demonstrated real progress including securing labs, carrying out successful testing with animal tissue, securing a source of human tissue, registering as a tax-exempt charity in the US and announcing a much requested crowd sourcing campaign, many of the detractors have been silenced.

The recent announcement of some of the above news has also attracted the attention of the mainstream media for the first time, with stories being featured in the UK’s Mirror and then the Daily Mail. Other news providers and bloggers then followed suit, with this Mama Mia piece being the first major Australian site to run with the story, albeit with an insensitive tone.

While I’ve had quite a satisfactory sex life with my current circumcised status, I’ve been I’ve been keeping an eye of Foregen’s progress, and would not have ruled out taking up the regeneration option should it ever become available. However, there is small but significant detail highlighted in the Mirror that leaves me a little squeamish:

This involves finding donor foreskins from dead bodies, stripping them of the donor’s cells (decellularization) to leave behind a tissue scaffold, and then populating that scaffold with the patient’s own stem cells, taken from their penis.

Using the organs and other body parts from those selfless souls who wish to leave them for others is now widely accepted. But the idea of having part of the penis from someone else attached to me brings visions of some low grade horror/pornography crossover movie. Would I be able to block out thoughts of the previous owner during love making?  How would my partner feel, or should I not tell her? Would I be obligated to disclose this information?

I applaud the progress that Foregen has made in their short history, and hope that thousands of men will finally feel complete once the procedure is proven successful.

I’m just not sure at this stage if the procedure is going to be for me.

 

Image courtesy of Photokanok at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

How to officially measure your penis length, and why most men are doing it wrong

When I was about 17 years old I read an article in a Cosmopolitan magazine which outlined the average penis length and girth. At the next opportunity I grabbed a ruler, took the measurement and felt both relieved and even a little pleased with the result.

Measuring penis sizeBut years later I received a rude shock. According to another study on penis size, I hadn’t measured myself correctly, and as a result I may have overestimated my size.

I learnt that there is typically a large difference in length, depending on which side of your penis you take the measurement from. I naturally took the measurement from the underside, or ventral side, because I figured this is the side that, when erect, is most visible to a partner. It seems that many other men also make this same mistake.

The problem with measuring from this side is that it is difficult to know at what point to start the measurement from. It is possible to stretch the scrotal skin at the base of the penis further under the body because the penile shaft actually extends in this area further than what can be initially seen.

For this reason, almost all surveys and studies on penis length measure the penis from the upper or dorsal side. That is, the side that is closest to your abdomen when your penis is erect. The base, or starting point of the penile shaft is more defined here, and therefore it is more accurate and there is less temptation to cheat.

From this base point, the penis should then be measured to the tip of the glans (or ‘head’). If you are lucky enough to still have your foreskin and it extends beyond your glans when erect, you should retract your foreskin so that you can measure to the end of your glans.

So I went from thinking that I was two centimeters (or almost one inch) over the average penis size to realising that I was just on average. Nothing to be too disappointed about, but being well over average height means that I may be proportionately on the small side.


Image courtesy of imagerymajestic at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

 

A look back at a penis obsessed year at the NT News

While most Australian tabloid newspapers wouldn’t shy away from a good story related to penises, it seems that in 2014 the NT News ran any story related to penises. And the stories didn’t even need to be relevant to the Northern Territory, or even Australia for that matter.

Searching for the keyword ‘penis’ on their website returns over 900 results. Some of the penis related articles published in 2014 involved fast bowler scratchings, funny signs (with a later follow-up piece), penis shaped termite mounds and trees, which all at least had an Australian context, to frivolous overseas stories associating penises to milk cartons, clouds, tourist maps, grafitti, birds and even the innocent milky bar treat. At least story on a botched circumcision had a slightly more serious health/risks of cosmetic surgery angle.

The story on the penis shaped running route map prompted a facebook follower of the page going by the name of ‘Woodie’ to call them out on their penis fetish with the following comment:

Does NT news have penis envy? Always stories with penises. Thought it was a newspaper, not a nudespaper!

Of course, the NT News could not help themselves by responding to the comment by emphasising the user’s unfortunate name:

We cater to what our audience love Mr Woodie.

We eventually discovered that the reason for their prolific penis pennings in 2014 was because the NT News had hired a dick joke correspondent, we daresay being the first newspaper in the world to do so.

We wonder if, in the interests of gender equality, we can expect the hiring of a vagina joke correspondent in 2015? Or perhaps once they have gained a following with the jokes they could bring some attention to some serious men’s health issues?

Australians lay claim to the world’s most realistic penis shaped rock

Forget the big prawn, banana, merino or any of the other man-made ‘big’ tourist attractions that Australia seems to have an obsession for creating. The big thing that Aussies should be most proud of is a natural formation which modest locals have simply called ‘the rock’, while outsiders refer to it more descriptively as ‘cock rock’.

This giant sized penis shaped rock is not only large, but also realistic, keeping its resemblence to a giant erection from multiple perspectives.

For those looking for an excuse to take a road trip, according to this YouTube video, the rock is just off the Dilgry Circle, near the intersection with Pheasant Creek Road in the Barrington Tops State Forest in New South Wales.

For those who want to take a quick look check out this photo on Flickr. What do you think? Is this the most impressive penis shaped rock on Earth?

 

 

The shared stupidity of culling sharks and cutting penises

Banning circumcision would make more sense than culling sharksAlthough I haven’t lived in Western Australia for a number of years, I still have friends and family who live in the South-West of the state, and are part of the beach and surfing culture of the area. Therefore I get frequent updates on the recently introduced shark culling strategy from people close to the issue. With the news coming through yesterday that the first shark has been caught and killed off the Dunsborough coast, I thought it was time to reflect on the similarities between this, and the issue of non-therapeutic male infant circumcision.

Both are about money

The Government assumes that if it can be shown to be doing something it will bring back the tourists and recreational divers with their much needed money, with the bonus of additional jobs created by the setting and 24 hour monitoring of baited drums. There is no money to be made, and no economic stimulus just leaving the sharks alone, just as there is no money to be made in not cutting penises.

Both are based on psuedo science

Scientists, 100 of them in all, have objected to the cull in an open letter to the Western Australian Government, similar to the way that international group of 38 physicians from 16 European countries denounced the American Acadamy of Pediatrics’ revised policy statement on male circumcision.

Both are based on fear and misunderstanding

Many of us have a fear of sharks, possibly made worse by certain feature films and media reports of the occasional attack. We also naturally fear the unknown, and there is much that we do not know about theses sharks. It is a shame that the resources have not been put into studying these creatures, so that we might learn more about their movements, feeding patterns, and ultimately gain an understanding of why they might attach humans. Just as many Australians have lived their whole lives without owning or experiencing a foreskin, then hear the myths perpetuated by some individuals, resulting in them fearing it so much that they must slice it away from their own children. If they only took the time to understand the 16+ functions of the foreskin they may think twice before doing so.

Neither have real-world examples to support them

Before deciding to undertake such drastic measures, you would think that there would be an example from somewhere around the world to show that shark culling is effective. The only previous shark culling program I could find was from Hawaii in the 1960’s and 1790’s, which resulted in no measurable reduction in the number of shark attacks. Similar to how real-world experience shows that there are no health benefits to routinely circumcising males. For example, the USA has one of the highest infant circumcision rates in the world, but also has a higher prevelance of HIV and STD infection than most European countries that do not circumcise their children.

Both don’t make sense on a cost/benefit analysis

The shark cull seems to be an awful lot of effort in an attempt to save one or two lives per year. Wouldn’t more lives be saved putting those resources into reducing drink driving, improving workplace safety, suicide prevention, pedestrian safety campaigns….the list could go on. Just as more lives could be saved by putting the health resources into just about any other real preventitive health initiative. As far as I know, no one has died in Australia from having a foreskin.

Both have less extreme and invasive alternatives

It is a sad reflection on our society that we often seem to be drawn to the most violent ‘solution’ to problems. The number one solution to reducing shark attacks, for those who are concerned about their own safety, is to simply stay out of the water. Just as abstinence or careful selection of sexual partners is the solution for those men who are intact and worried that this status may put them at higher risk of STDs (which, by the way, is a myth.) For those who do still want to enter the water, there are devices that can be worn to deter sharks, just as those who wish to engage in more promiscuous activity can wear a condom.

Both are futile attempts to prevent things that are extremely rare

Even if the culling of sharks was sucessfull in completely eliminating shark deaths, it would only be saving one or two lives per year. In the same way that pro-circumcision advocates claim that circumcision can reduce the risk of penile cancer. Even if circumcision did reduce the risk, the disease in developed nations occurs in only 1 in 100,000 men and even then, mostly occurs in elderly men.

Proponents of both use semantics and euphemisms

WA Fisheries Minister Troy Buswell has stated that this is not a cull, but a ‘shark mitigation strategy’, which sounds much more scientific and less barbaric. Just as the pro-circumcision crowd fights hard to keep the euphemism ‘circumcision’ while many are now referring to the procedure as ‘male genital mutilation’.

 

One could find parallels between any debate that has fear and economics pitted against science and logic, and some may see this as an attempt to ride on the coat tails of another, seemingly unrelated cause. And they may be partially right. The goal of this post is to raise awareness of the stupidity of non-therapeutic infant circumcision with those who can see the same types of stupidity in culling sharks. But equally, I also hope that those who are against infant circumcision might be introduced to the shark culling issue, raising awareness for both of these important causes.

Image courtesy of Luigi Diamanti / freedigitalphotos.net

Corona is not just a beer: The Australian guide to the penis

Corona is not only a beerHow well do you know your own penis? While there are plenty of articles in both women’s and men’s magazines that go into great detail on female genital anatomy, there is little said, apart from crude jokes and discussions about size, about our own bits. As our parts are mostly external, perhaps we think that because we can see it we know everything about it? Well there is often more to it than meets the eye. In the following we give a brief introduction to some of the individual parts of the penis, and explain them in a way that the Australian man can easily understand.

Corona

Corona is a Mexican beer, famous for its citrus aroma and flavour. Many Australian drinkers garnish their beer with a wedge of lemon or lime to highlight these flavours, although some say this is simply a marketing ploy. Garnishing your own corona in the same way is not recommended given that it is one of the most sensitive parts of your penis, and may result in intense stinging! The corona (or corona glandis/coronal ridge) is the rim or flange at the base of the glans (or ‘head’) of the penis. Stimulation is achieved by the action of the foreskin ‘rolling’ or ‘gliding’ over the corona.

Every time I see someone drinking a Corona beer I question if the marketing department at this company did much research before naming their beer. Although the brand has been around since the 1800s, and also means ‘crown’, so perhaps they can be forgiven.

Sulcus

Some Australian men might know the sulcus as a new toothbrush from Oral B but it is also part of your penis. Although this toothbrush has been designed for sensitive teeth and gums, remeber that, despite the poorly chosen name, it is for your teeth and not your actual sulcus. Ouch!

So what is the sulcus? To be fair to Proctor and Gambler, the term sulcus is not unique to the penis, and is defined as a deep, narrow furrow or groove, as in an organ or tissue. It is a term most commonly associated with the narrow fissures in the brain. The sulcus on your penis, or more correctly, the ‘coronal sulcus’ is the groove underneath your corona.

Bands

Something we go to see at a pub on saturday nights. You also have multiple bands on your penis. The most significant of these is the ridged band (or frenar/frenular) band which according to cirp.org is a “ring of deeply corrugated or ridged mucous membrane lining the tip of the prepuce which provides “important sexual reflexes and erogenous sensation”.

Smegma

This should not be mistaken for a brand of top-end kitchen appliances (that’s just smeg), or a made up swear word on the tv series Red Dwarf. According to circumstitions.com it is “A natural secretion of skin cells and oils that collects under the foreskin in both males and females” that has “lubricant, pheromonal (sexual attractant) and perhaps bacteriostatic (bacteria-killing) functions”. It can be a case of too much of a good thing so the occasional wash is in order.

Frenulum

If you don’t know what this is stick out your tongue in front of the mirror and look underneath it. The bit that attaches your tongue to the bottom of your mouth is the lingual frenulum. The frenulum on your penis looks similar, and is the ridge of skin under the glans, joining it to the foreskin. Some call this the male G spot, but different men report varying degrees of sensation.

Docking

This is what farmers sometimes do to sheep tails, right? If you are the slightest bit homophobic perhaps you should leave it at that and don’t read on, because this gets a bit graphic. When I was about ten, I wondered what homosexual men actually did with each other. I thought that they somehow managed to wrap or twist their penises together. When I learned a bit more I remembered thinking back about how naive I was as a ten year old. As it turns out, I wasn’t far off the mark. “Docking” is a sexual technique where one man will extend his foreskin beyond the end of his penis and continue to roll his foreskin onto his partner’s penis.

Foreskin

Many older Australian men may define this as ‘the bit that is cut off during circumcision’. Most younger guys who were left intact know what this is, and know that it is much more than the ‘useless flap of skin’ it was called in the past. In fact, it is not even skin, but a richly nerve-laden group of special structures including the frenulum, dartos and ridged band. For those who have had theirs taken away and read this with a heavy heart, reading about foreskin restoration below may lift your spirits.

Glans

Every Australian man would know what this part is, you just may not know the correct name for it! Most of us probably call this the ‘head’ or sometimes ‘helmet’.

Dartos

This may sound like a spanish version of the pub game usually played with a beer in the non-throwing hand, but it is actually a thin layer of muscle under the skin of the scrotum and penis, and is prominent around the tip of the foreskin. Here it forms a sphincter to close around the end of the glans. It is what causes ‘shrinkage’ in cold weather.

Corpus cavernosum

This may sound like something you missed during religous studies in primary school. Wasn’t this the cave where Jesus Christ was interred? While an internal part, you should still understand it considering it is important for erectile health. The corpus cavernosum is basically your erectile tissue. When aroused, your brain will send instructions to fill this erectile tissue with blood, resulting in an erection. There are exercises and products that can strengthen and grow the corpus cavernosum resulting in stronger and longer erections. While it seems that most women don’t care too much about penis size, if this is important to you these methods can actually work, where magic pills and potions will not.

Foreskin restoration

Australian men like to restore old things, especially houses, motorbikes, cars and tractors. What you may not know, even though it is now getting greater media exposure, is that you can also restore your foreskin. ‘Restoration’ may actually be a misnomer, as the process is more like ‘growing it back’. It involves putting tension on the foreskin remnant to induce a process called mitosis, where new skin cells are grown. This new skin eventually can cover the glans to look and feel similar to the real thing. However, it’s a little bit like taking a standard VH Valliant Charger and modifying the engine, front grill and sticking on some decals to make it look like an R/T.  It might look like the real deal from a distance but upon closer inspection and a test drive you can tell its not quite the same.

 

Image courtesy of khunaspix / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

New cure for baldness brings new meaning to the phrase ‘dickhead’

Using foreskins to cure baldness?Many Australian news sites today, including the Telegraph, Sydney Morning Herald and the Age reported that a new experiment could potentially stop baldness.

Researchers have successfully grafted skin with new hair folicles onto lab mice, by using tissue from harvested human infant foreskins.

Is this a case of robbing Peter to pay Paul? On an ethical level, it would hard to justify making a cosmetic alteration to a non-consenting infant to enable another cosmetic alteration to an adult. Especially when you consider that to the original owner, the foreskin has many functional qualities which would be sacrificed for a purely cosmetic alteration to someone else. Fine if this truly was medical waste, but it is commonly accepted that there is almost never a medical reason to circumcise an infant.

I find it odd that this ethical and moral minefield didn’t rate a mention from the traditional Australian media.

This would not be the first time that infant foreskins have been used for the vanity of adults. An Australian distributor for face cream SkinMedica has found out that many Australians are not going to accept the use of harvested human foreskins in its products, with blogs drawing attention to the issue and complaints submitted to the company’s website. Oprah Winfrey has also been met with protests over her endorsement of the face creams.

Many Australian men already think that those who are balding should just accept it, and that those who resort to medical procedures to cure their baldness should be called ‘dickheads’. (With Shane Warne receiving the lion’s share of this sentiment). Perhaps this sentiment was a little harsh, but I think that for anyone who puts infant foreskins on their heads, the label is justified.

Image courtesy of David Castillo Dominici / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Australian websites jump on the penis dunking and penis beaker craze

Australian online news sites have recently been abuzz with reports on the previously unknown post-coital act of what has been coined ‘penis dunking’ with a newly defined object now named the ‘penis beaker’.

I think I’ve given enough information for those with even a limited imagination to understand the concept, even though it seems none of us actually do it.

But for those who need a little help to put the picture together, here is some text from the original post on a site called mumsnet:

“We have a dedicated post-sex clean-up area on the bedside table. A box of tissues, a small bin, and a beaker of clean water for temporary cleaning/dunking while the bathroom is occupied by me. Apparently our penis beaker is strange and not the done thing. Does everyone else just lay there in a sticky post coital glow until morning? Really?”

The answer to the question posed in the last sentence, judging from the comments on the post, appears to be ‘yes’. While there were different variations on cleaning up involving showering, bides or plain old wiping, no comments confirmed the same routine.

So this latest ‘craze’ is not is not for the act of ‘penis dunking’ or the ‘penis beaker’ itself, which has now been confirmed as being performed by only one man worldwide. Rather, the craze is in the reporting of it.

Firstly there was a news.com.au article on October 11 titled “Query about ‘penis dunking’ goes viral on UK website Mumsnet”. Then today the Sydney Morning Herald picked up the story with their article “Why we can’t help wondering about other people’s sex lives“.  Curiously, this article links through to the news.com.au article rather than the Mumsnet post, perhaps revealling where they got their inspiration for the piece. We recently saw a similar pattern of copying penis related articles when news.com.au reported on foreskin restoration, not long after a similar article on a UK online news site.

And yes, we are also guilty, and probably more so by reporting on the reporting of the penis dunking/beaker phenomenon. But we are simply fascinated that the unique routine of one man, when each of us probably have a unique penis related routine, could cause such a stir.

One serious question we wanted to explore though was whether there was any benefit to washing one’s penis after sex. The results of some quick research were surprising.

We found that a study, presented at a HIV conference in Sydney, has shown that washing the penis immediately after sex actually increases the risk of contracting HIV, at least among uncircumcised (intact) men. The study states “there ought to be a little time left for postcoital cuddling before you go and wash”. Sounds familiar? Perhaps written by a woman with another agenda?

The only other guidance we could find suggested that washing your hands immediately after sex could reduce the risk of contracting sexually transmitted diseases. We could find no further recommendations on washing genitalia.

So it seems that there is no compelling reason for the ‘penis dunking’ into the ‘penis beaker’. Even if there was evidence to suggest it reduced the risk of STD infection, apparently the partaker is in a monogomous relationship with his wife. So it appears that the act is done purely for personal preference, to which we say, good on him.

 

 

Foreskin restoration growing in popularity in Australia

Some of us were circumcised as babies, and we are absolutely fine with it. Some of us are uncircumcised (intact) and fine with it too. A small percentage of men who were left intact decide to have it done later in life – mostly for medical reasons but sometimes for cultural reasons. And that’s fine too.

But there are some men who were circumcised and are not happy about it. For this group, in the past it was a case of just having to accept it, or being told to ‘get over it’ when these concerns were expressed to others.

Now it seems that more and more Australian men are learning that there is actually something that can be done about it.  The news.com.au website today published an article called Meet the circumcised men who want to restore their foreskins. The article explains the basic concept of putting tension on the remnant foreskin to encourage the growth of new cells, to gradually grow the skin over the glans. While not re-growing some of the specialised structures and tissues, the result can closely resemble and function like a real foreskin.

While foreskin resotoration was well known in Roman times, the art was lost until it was rediscovered in the 1970’s. The proliferation of the internet in the 1990’s made it possible to share the knowledge and techniques more widely. However, I believe that today was the first time that the Australian mainstream media, albeit an online outlet, has dedicated an entire article to foreskin restoration.

Unfortunately it seems that no comments are being published, so I’ll make some corrections and highlight ommissions here.

Firstly, the article portrays foreskin restoration as a process that is so disruptive to normal life that it is almost impractical to do. Most restorers I have connected with have managed to easily fit the routine into their lives with only minor adjustments. In addition, the article omits to mention that their are other methods that are less invasive, especially the manual methods where the restorer needs to only use their hands to gently stretch the skin at various times throughout the day – usually at toilet breaks.

My next comment on the article is that the ‘top doctor’ the author spoke to at the Australian Medical Association appears to have no knowledge of the natural restoration process. His comments were in relation to surgical restoration techniques, which was not the topic of the article. Ironically, he warned that surgery would result in a scarred penis – much like the scars caused by the original circumcision surgery.

Finally, I found it odd that the article ends with links and phone numbers to mental health and depression services. Is the author suggesting that only men with mental health issues would worry about being circumcised and consider restoration? Is this an attempt to dismiss the real concerns of men?

In any case it is good to see the media finally taking the topic of foreskin restoration seriously, and exposing many more Australian men to the benefits of restoring.